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Posts Tagged ‘Monosaccharides’

talk to me about FODMAPS

In GAPS diet, must read blog posts, paleo, topics on July 13, 2012 at 4:44 pm

UPDATE 9/16/12: You must listen to this podcast that SCD Diet did with Dr. Allison Siebecker on FODMAPs: You can download the MP3 file here

FODMAPs-SIBO relationship

The acronym FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols.  The term FODMAPs was coined by Australian researchers Susan J. Shepherd and Peter R. Gibson; they found that a low FODMAP diet helped up to 75% of their IBS patients. A low FODMAP diet avoids foods containing certain sugars and fibers capable of causing diarrhea, constipation, gas, bloating and abdominal pain in people with IBS.

 
Common examples of FODMAPs

  • Fructose: a single sugar which naturally occurs in fruits, honey and some vegetables. It is thought that 30-40 per cent of IBS sufferers, and also 30-40 per cent of the general population, suffer from fructose malabsorption (although symptoms can vary widely in how much discomfort they cause).
  • Fructans: a chain molecule of many fructose sugar units joined together, naturally occurring in wheat, onions and many other foods. Because fructans are combined fructose molecules, people who suffer from fructose malabsorption should also avoid these foods.
  • Polyols: often used as an artificial sweetener in gums and confectionery (usually with the warning ‘excess consumption may have a laxative effect’), and naturally occurring in some fruits and vegetables.
  • Lactose: a double-sugar which is contained in the milk from cows, sheep and goats.
  • Galactans: a chain molecule of many single sugar units joined together, commonly found in legumes, baked beans, kidney beans, chickpeas and lentils.

 
FODMAPs  can be poorly absorbed during the digestive process. They are rapidly fermented by the bacteria that live in your gut. They can alter the fluid balance in your gut. Together, these effects can lead to bouts of IBS symptoms within hours of eating a high FODMAP meal or snack. By reducing the overall dietary load of these carbohydrates, you can often reduce your troublesome GI symptoms, but that might not be enough.

Symptoms can include: bloating, wind, abdominal distension,discomfort, abdominal pain, inconsistent or excessive bowel movements, lethargy, and even psychological symptoms such as anxiety or depression.

I know these symptoms well. And stress only makes it worse.

 

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